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Custody agreements can help prevent child abductions from country

It is always in the best interests of the child if divorcing parents make a concerted effort to maintain a civil relationship after going their separate ways. And even if the ex-spouses have difficulty getting along, it is a legal imperative that both parties adhere to the terms of the custody agreement.

Unfortunately, sometimes one of the parents is unwilling to share custody or is dissatisfied with the terms of visitation and decides to take matters into his or her own hands and absconds with the child. Such a nightmare scenario is difficult enough to deal with if the child is taken to another state, but if the abduction crosses international borders, then the situation can become both harrowing and complex.

If you suspect that your child's other parent may have designs on taking your child out of the country without your consent, there are some proactive measures you can take. There are several recommendations found on the U.S. Department of State's website. One suggestion is to create a custody agreement that is extremely detailed in regard to the times and dates in which visitation is to take place.

There are a number of more specific steps that can be taken, including requiring consent for a parent to take a child out of the country or state and requesting the courts to order that passports be held by neutral third parties.

If you believe that your child's other parent may have designs on removing the child from the country, then it is very important that you get terms in your custody agreement that limit his or her opportunities to do so. As such, you may wish to share your concerns with a Texas child custody attorney, who can offer you guidance and work toward helping to keep your child secure.

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