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Accounting for all funds is important in high asset divorce

Often by the time spouses divorce, communication has all but vanished. Sometimes anger and resentment become so strong that the couple simply cannot speak civilly to one another. This state of affairs may be years in the making. During this time, spouses may begin to keep important things from each other. This can include information pertaining to the acquisition of money or property.

This withholding of information can prove very significant if one of the parties is in possession of a high volume of unrevealed wealth. High asset divorce cases are often very complicated. There can be many considerations that come into play when it comes time to divide the money and property accrued by a couple during their marriage. If one spouse attempts to hide assets in an effort to keep the other spouse from getting his or her share, the situation can be that much more complicated.

There are any number of ways in which assets can be hidden by a spouse. For example, money can be placed in an account under the name of a friend or family member. The spouse could also move money into the accounts of his or her company, making the funds appear to be earmarked for business rather than personal use.

If you are contemplating or in the process of a high asset divorce, it is important to account for as many assets as possible. If you believe your spouse is trying to keep funds out of the settlement, an investigation may help reveal the location of the hidden assets.

At Regan Armstrong and Associates, we are familiar with the process of searching for hidden assets. You can visit our page dedicated to property division and read about our services.

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