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Visitation is important for infants and young children

A divorce can be very difficult for children. An older child may demonstrate obvious signs of stress or discontent caused by the life changes created by a divorce. But even though it may not be as readily apparent, very young children may also experience anxiety when parents part ways.

As visitation-for-children-under-age-3?ref=KsxcO" target="_blank" >this article describes, when couples with infants divorce, it is important they establish specific visitation rules. During a child?s early years, a non-custodial parent should have regular and frequent visitation. Visitation periods should last at least two hours. However, overnight stays are not recommended.

By the time a child is six months of age, he or she may be aware of a parent?s absence if there is not sufficient visitation time. Children who do not receive regular and frequent visits may begin to exhibit signs of separation anxiety. When a non-custodial parent spends time with a child who is between six and 18 months of age, attention should be given to forming an attachment.

As children get older, their needs change. It is a good idea to consider these changes when working out child custody details. Ideally, both parents will have ample opportunity to bond with their children. It benefits all involved when parents work together when dealing with custody and visitation issues.

If you are in the process of getting a divorce, a Texas family law attorney could help you work out a number of issues. In addition to offering guidance in crafting child custody terms, the attorney could also help establish child support guidelines.

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