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Plan your prenuptial agreement carefully

A prenuptial agreement is something that can help your marriage. It can also help you handle the property division process if you end up getting a divorce. There seems to be a misconception that only rich people need prenups. This isn't the case. All adults who are getting married can benefit from a prenuptial agreement.

One of the primary purposes of a prenuptial agreement is to make it clear about who will get what if you divorce. This can be helpful in many areas, including real estate, investments and inheritances. Be sure to be clear about these points so that there aren't questions about the terms if you end up going through a divorce.

There are other points that can be included in a prenuptial agreement. Fidelity is a big one for many people. This clause in the prenup will set conditions for what will happen if one spouse is caught cheating on the other spouse. These conditions might include not being able to seek alimony or giving up all rights to property.

Some points can't be included in a prenup at all. You can't write any clauses that go against Texas law. This means that child support and child custody are forbidden in premarital agreements. You also can't include any provisions that are based on property or assets that haven't been disclosed.

The beauty of a prenup is that it is a fully personalized agreement. You and your soon-to-be spouse can decide what to include in it. Just make sure that you have the prenup set up in a way that is legal and that it is presented and signed in accordance with Texas laws.

Source: Forbes, "3 Ways To Help Decide If You Should Get a Prenup," Ginger Dean, accessed Oct. 04, 2017

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