Jump to Navigation

Think about addressing the need for a prenuptial agreement

Before you get married, you need to think carefully about how you are going to protect yourself if you get a divorce. This isn't a popular thought, but it does need to be considered. One way to protect yourself is by having a premarital agreement drawn up for you and your betrothed.

A prenuptial agreement is almost always a good thing, but it might be difficult to discuss this with the person whom you are going to marry. But it's important that you don't put this off for too long because your future spouse must have time to consult their own attorney and review the terms of the agreement.

Prenuptial agreements don't govern only assets. You can also include debts that each person has coming into the marriage so that the other person isn't saddled with those debts if the marriage ends.

Another thing to consider when you are drafting your prenup is to include terms for any potential inheritance that either spouse may receive. You can even include provisions that address the settlement one spouse will receive for giving up a career to rear the children or maintain the home.

You may wish to include other contingencies in your prenuptial agreement, so make sure to make a list of all of the terms. You can discuss your concerns with an attorney who can help you determine what can legally be included in the agreement and what needs to omitted. Matters involving the amount of child support and which parent will retain physical custody of the children can't be included in a prenup.

Source: FindLaw, "Pros and Cons: Premarital Agreements ("Prenuptials")," accessed Aug. 24, 2017

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Tell Us About Your
Legal issue

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Subscribe to this blog's feed FindLaw Network