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The holidays and divorce

According to a story from the Associated Press, there's a new "holiday" emerging in the United States. We all know about Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's, but have you heard of Divorce Day? Okay, so it's not going to be officially recognized and no one is going to get off of work for it, but it refers to the phenomenon of divorces that happen right after the holiday season. It's the day when attorneys get into the office to see roughly double the amount of emails regarding divorce than the rest of the year. And that influx of requests stays constant throughout the month of January.

What's the reason behind this phenomenon? Some experts think that it's because couples place grand expectations on the holidays, relying on the cheer, the guests and the lavish presents to rescue a flagging marriage. Also, the Christmas season can be an unusually stressful time for many couples, and it's for many of the same reasons. Family is in town and causing strife, the gifts didn't hit the mark, or the entire season just didn't live up to expectation and couples are faced with a letdown.

If you're experiencing some of these feelings, you first want to examine if they are just temporary and bound to pass after the post-holiday malaise. If not, you and your spouse might want to seek out a marriage counselor to examine the problems in the relationship.

If you've made up your mind, you'll want to contact a divorce attorney, who can help make sure your interests are represented when it comes to child support, custody and alimony.

Source: laurinburgexchange.com, "After holidays, Divorce Day often looms," December 27, 2016

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