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Physical and legal child custody

Child custody is common concept in the United States. Despite it being very common, most people are not aware of the several different kinds of child custody. Physical custody is one of the more widely known kind of custody. Physical custody is when a court order which grants a parent the right to have the child to live with him or her.

In some states, joint physical custody may be awarded which implies that the child has to stay with either one of the parents for significant amounts of time. This usually happens when the parents live close to each other. If the parents reside at a substantial distance from one another, the child may get distressed from all the moving around. In such cases, sole physical custody might be the better option. Joint custody arrangements are presented to a judge in order to fix any irregularities and are tailored around each parent's schedule.

Sole physical custody is a term that describes a child living with one parent for a majority of the time while the other parent has only limited visitation or custody rights. It is not uncommon for a judge to award a single parent sole custody, although recently there has been a trend towards leniency in visitation rights. Sole custody is often granted in cases where one of the parents is deemed unfit to take care of the child full-time. Reasons that may make the parent unfit include addiction to drugs and history of alcohol abuse.

In order to know more about your rights as a parent, you might want to consider hiring an experienced attorney. An attorney would asses everything and advise you on what type of custody would be best for your situation.

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