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Consider paying alimony in one lump sum

Disputes are going to happen when two people decide to get divorced. After all, couples who are getting divorced usually aren't seeing eye to eye on many things. They will argue over who gets the house, the cars and maybe even the furniture. In addition to arguments about property, spouses may find themselves disagreeing about who deserves to receive alimony and how it will be paid.

Typically, when a person is ordered to pay alimony, they will make monthly payments for however long the courts have determined is appropriate. This option is suitable for some, but not everyone enjoys being reminded of their failed marriage month after month when they go to make the alimony payment. For that reason, people have opted to pay in one lump sum.

Not only do those who pay in one lump sum get to rid themselves of the constant reminder of their marriage, but they also avoid enforcement issues that many of those who pay alimony have to deal with. One drawback to paying one lump sum is that they will be paying more than they would be if they made monthly payments, but if it keeps the paying spouse from having to deal with other issues, then it may be worth it to encourage their spouse to accept one large payment.

In the midst of a divorce, it still may not be clear which spouse, if any, will be the one to pay alimony. However, that doesn't mean you shouldn't be aware of your options should you end up being the paying spouse. With the help of an attorney from Regan Armstrong & Associates, all of your questions about alimony and payment options can be answered.

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