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Listening is key when discussing prenuptial agreements

Entering a marriage creates a wealth of emotions, most of which are positive. There is great joy in finding the person you believe you want to spend the remainder of your days with. And yet, it is not unusual or wrong to also feel some measure of apprehension. After all, the mere thought of such a strong connection ever failing is extremely daunting. But one thing that may partially allay some of your worries is creating a prenuptial agreement.

In a previous post, we addressed things to keep in mind when broaching the subject of a prenup. In this post, we will examine how to proceed when actively discussing your agreement. According to an article published on a popular news website, one of the most important things you can do is assure your partner that the purpose of a prenup is to provide both of you with a measure of financial security.

It is also helpful to be a good listener. It is all too easy for couples to misinterpret each other's motivations and feelings. But if you actively share the experience of creating the agreement and openly trade ideas, you may be able to avoid misunderstandings.

You can also use your prenup conversations as a warm up for when you are married and dealing with the complicated issues that arise after the exchange of vows. Your ability to work through such issues will be critical to having a successful marriage.

Even if you know what you want contained in your prenuptial agreement, it is a good idea to have an experienced family law attorney help you work out the details. The attorney can help you draft an agreement that encompasses the full range of your financial needs and goals.

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