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Fathers may need help getting fair custody terms

Most married couples will exhaust all other possibilities prior to taking the divorce route. And the fact is, while a divorce is sometimes a necessary and beneficial move, it can also become extremely stressful and even contentious. This can be especially true if the couple have children.

It is not unusual for parents to take every possible step in an effort to save their marriage for the benefit of their children. This may be because both parents realize that having the complete family under one roof is the preferable situation if at all possible. Another reason a parent may be concerned about getting a divorce is if he or she is afraid that the outcome of the custody agreement would make it difficult to spend time with the children.

Fathers might especially be afraid that they would not receive favorable treatment if a court were to decide on the terms of possession and visitation. This concern may be well justified if the divorce was particularly acrimonious. The sad fact is, sometimes an angry ex-spouse may work to make sure that the father's parental rights are limited or even completely negated.

But in such situations, it is important for a man to stand up for his rights to see his children. And he can do this by making as strong a showing as possible when entering a courtroom to ask for fair custody terms. To do this, a father must demonstrate that the terms he wants are in the child's best interests.

At Regan Armstrong & Associates, we work with parents who are in the process of determining the terms of their child custody agreement. If you are in such a situation, we may be able to help you. First, we can discuss the type of custody you are seeking and then we can develop a strategy to help show the court why you should be granted the terms you desire. Please feel free to contact us so we can discuss your case.

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