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Mothers can also be guilty of failing to pay child support

When a father fails to keep up with child support payments, he may be labeled a "deadbeat dad." Certainly, if a man is tasked with making support payments for the care of his child, then he must be held accountable when he does not do so.

But according to a data expert, women can also have issues when it comes to paying child support. In fact, the expert says that of custodial fathers who had been awarded child support, 32 percent did not receive any due payments in 2011. Comparatively, 25 percent of custodial mothers failed to obtain their awarded support during the same year.

The data expert points out that the number of fathers paying child support is significantly higher than the number of mothers. But still, what would account for the higher non-payment rate among mothers? The data expert says that according to the director of a research partnership, a mother who has been placed in the position of paying support may be facing personal struggles. A mother may not be able to gain steady employment or she may have other issues.

A parent who has been ordered to pay child support has a legal obligation to do so. However, sometimes personal issues can arise that make it impossible to maintain the payments. If you have a legitimate reason for being unable to satisfy your support requirements, you may be able to have your agreement modified.

A Texas family law attorney could assess your circumstances to see if you may be eligible for a modification of your payments.

Source: KENW-FM, "Who Fails To Pay Child Support? Moms, At A Higher Rate Than Dads," March 3, 2015

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