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Prospective adoptive parents must participate in home study

Deciding to adopt a child is a wonderful choice to make. But before you can bring that special someone home, there is a process that you will be required to go through. The law dictates that prospective adoptive parents must take part in what is called a "home study."

The home study process serves three basic functions. First, it allows for an assessment of the potential adoptive family's fitness for adopting a child. Second, it can help prepare the family for the adoption. And third, it provides the opportunity for a social worker to gather information that can help see that a child is paired with the family who best suits his or her needs.

These three functions can be fulfilled through a variety of steps. These steps can include visits to the home, interviews, references, background checks and income statements. While this process may seem daunting, you should know that the agencies performing the studies are not trying to find flawless parents. They are simply looking for regular people to be parents for children who need a home. The sense of humor and flexibility it takes to raise a child are characteristics that can also be used to great effect when going through your study.

On the whole, working with a social worker could prove an extremely positive and useful experience as you prepare for the new addition to your family. A Texas family law attorney could also prove of benefit in expediting the adoption process. The attorney could act as your representative as you work toward your goal of giving a child the loving home they need and deserve.

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