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Things to know about summer parenting time disputes

During the summer, the saying “it takes a village to raise a child” takes on added significance. Most school age children are on summer break, which means that they are participating in day camps or are travelling to see relatives that they do not get to see during the school year.

When this happens, disputes can occur when it comes to appropriate children’s activities. Perhaps a parent objects to a child taking part in a baseball camp because it conflicts with their parenting time; or a grandparent may have a problem with getting time with the child because the parents are embroiled in a dispute with them. 

Situations like these deserve a conversation with an experienced family law attorney so that a person’s rights and options can be learned. As we have written before, there are certain problems that a family court simply will not resolve. Disputes over which summer camp a child will participate in and who will be responsible for paying for extra-curricular activities are the sort of problems that a court will likely decline to resolve.

Essentially a court may have the expectation that adults will have the maturity and foresight to put their personal interests aside and act in the children’s best interests.

However, if a parent uses disputes over activities to deny parenting time, either to the other parent or to grandparents, the court may be inclined to intervene if the proper motion is filed. With that said, contact an attorney to learn how your situation can be resolved with (or without) court intervention. 

The preceding is not intended to be legal advice

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