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Open celebration of divorce is new trend

Many Texans love to find reasons to gather and celebrate. It makes us happy to convene in joyous recognition of such milestones as birthdays, anniversaries, retirements and engagements. All of these events are well established landmarks, but these days, more and more people are adding divorce to the list of rationales to pop corks and blow noisemakers.

An event planner for a company based in Montclair, New Jersey, says that the divorce party trend had its start around five years ago. She also says she makes arrangements for 10 to 15 divorce parties yearly.

This new tendency to openly look upon a divorce as a positive or even happy event is in sharp contrast to the way divorce was socially acknowledged in the past. For a long period of time, divorce carried with it a tinge of shame that muted any expressions of joy that those making the split may have actually felt.

However, many people are now freely embracing the therapeutic qualities that can be found in celebrating rather than mourning the end of a marriage. A clinical psychologist actually recommends parties as a means for a suffering divorcee to gather with friends as an alternative to staying stuck in an unhappy state of emotion.

Of course, even if a divorce is a positive event in one’s life, there is still the matter of legal issues with which to contend. If a couple has children, then custody details must be attended to. Likewise, matters of property division and spousal support may also come into play.

Whether you wish to celebrate the end of your marriage or not, you still must get the details of the divorce clarified before moving on to the next phase of your life. A Texas divorce attorney may be able to help you get terms that are favorable to your concerns.

Source: The Huffington Post, “Divorce American Style Is Changing,” Martin Zabell, July 18, 2014

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