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New Year's is common time for divorces

Many industries and facets of life have trends that can be linked to the calendar. June, for example, is a common month for weddings in Houston. January is the month in which new gym memberships can be at their annual peak. Challenges with depression or other conditions such as SAD can be more noticeable during the winter months, when daylight is less prevalent. January and February tend to record more deaths of ill people who managed to make it through the holidays.

Similarly, January is the month that a large number of divorces are initiated. This increase is the subject of a recent article that ponders some of the reasons that this may occur. The decision to divorce is rarely a simple one with concerns abounding from property division to child custody and more. People often give consideration to divorce for some time before actually proceeding forward. For some, the hope that the holidays may bring some renewed bond or reason to stay together is gone when the calendar moves to January, leading to the decision to pursue a split.

The article’s author does note that in 2008, the year the latest economic recession began, was the only year he has not experienced such an increase in divorce action in January. Concerns about the cost of divorce or of living separately may have contributed to that as the recovering economy once again sees the annual activity level increase in January.

No matter the reason, if you are considering a divorce this New Year, you may consider speaking with an attorney to make sure that you are appropriately protected through the process.

Source: Huffington Post, “Is January National Divorce Month?,” Stann Givens, January 5, 2014

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