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Divorce does not always have to entail litigation

A divorce, no matter what the circumstances, can have far-reaching effects on many people including the spouses, children and even extended family members. While some of this is unavoidable, Houston couples that are facing the prospect of a divorce do have some options for how to minimize the negative impact on themselves and their children.

Not all divorce cases need to end up in front of a judge. Divorce mediation, for example, can be an alternative that couples could consider and gives both parties an opportunity to work with a neutral party to make decisions. A recent article discusses mediation as well as collaborative divorce and cooperative divorce options. Each of these is slightly different but all are intended to help couples negotiate their divorce settlements without going to court. Choosing one of these options can help you save money and time and maintain privacy.

A cooperative divorce can resemble what many people consider a typical divorce today with each spouse retaining an individual attorney to help negotiate agreements from child support to spousal support and more. In this scenario, however, it is the intention that all agreements be reached without the input of a judge. Collaborative divorce is similar in that spouses hire attorneys and other field experts that work to collaboratively identify solutions without litigation.

No matter what approach you may take to your divorce—from mediation to litigation, it can be helpful to consult with an experienced family law attorney. Doing so can be a good way for you to ensure that you understand all laws and do not end up with a settlement that hurts you in the end.

Source: Huffington Post, “Divorce Confidential: Should I Negotiate or Litigate My Divorce?,” Caroline Choi, September 25, 2013

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