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Things about divorce no one tells you about

When people find out that you are divorcing, they may have numerous bits of advice. Some will be supportive and say that they will be there when you need them, others will simply judge you and draw their own conclusions about whose fault it is that the marriage is no more. 

Regardless of what people say about divorce, or try to prepare you for the experience, there are always things that are unsaid, or left up to you to experience for yourself. For those divorcing in Houston or in Harris County, we will try to identify some of those untold nuances of divorce. 

Family transitions - No matter how much you may try, you will not have the "traditional" family that you envisioned when you first got married. But this is okay, because blended families are becoming the new normal.

Court orders - As long as a court order dictates how much time (and when) you spend time with kids, you may not have as much say in parenting your children. 

Battle lines - Friends and family members will always choose sides no matter how amicable you become after the divorce.

The scarlet letter - If you tell people you are divorced, they are likely to look at you differently at first...unless they have been divorced as well.

The matchmakers - Despite your protests, people will want to set you up on dates after a divorce. There's nothing wrong with letting them, because life goes on.

For more information on nuances about life during divorce, an experienced family law attorney can help. 

Source: HuffingtonPost.com, Divorce realities no one tells you about, June 30, 2013

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