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Alamo Director caught in sexting scandal

Fair or unfair, we tend to expect our political leaders and those holding high-profile positions to conduct themselves with a sense of class and professionalism that others aspire to have. If they are married, we expect them to work through problems (that we may not want to work through) and avoid compromising situations that can be fodder for tabloid magazines.

Perhaps this is why it is so surprising when they are embroiled in sex scandals. Such was the case with the executive administrator for the Alamo in San Antonio.

Melinda Navarro is in the midst of a divorce case and a scandal where she is accused of sending lude text messages to another man. Besides the claims of adultery, she is accused of using a phone meant for business to carry on the affair.

According to a report from the Houston Chronicle, Navarro (who is a member of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas) admits to sending explicit text messages (otherwise known as "sexting"), but claims that it is an attempt from her husband to create a media frenzy during their divorce. State representatives have expressed their dismay over the scandal and believe that action should be taken.

Moreover, Navarro denies having an affair. 

The sexting scandal may draw significant media attention, but it is important because it exemplifies the type of distractions disgruntled parties may try to create during a divorce. If you are in the midst of a high-profile divorce (or believe you may soon be in one), the assistance of an experienced family law attorney is invaluable.

Source: Chron.com, Divorce case reveals sexting by Alamo's overseer, June 5, 2013

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