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Technology becoming more prominent in divorce cases

Is cheating easier in cyberspace? Can infidelity be covered up by using Trojan horse email accounts or secret cell phones? What used to be difficult to find through conventional means is now easy to discover through advanced technology.

As more people resort to social media and computers to hide (or brag about) their indiscretions, scorned spouses are turning to investigative firms to gather information that will help them in subsequent divorces. They help divorcees mine the Internet for incriminating Facebook rants, Twitter posts and images to get the upper hand in divorces.

According to a Houston Chronicle article, it appears that the more money involved in a divorce, the more likely it is that cyber-warfare will be a prominent part. More discoverable information is being found through the Internet, despite attorneys' warnings that people should not post about their affairs online.

Social media research is also important when child custody disputes arise. It would be particularly embarrassing for a parent claiming to be prudent and responsible to be shown online pictures of them binge drinking or in compromising positions. Likewise, a parent who claims to mild-mannered would be ashamed of how he (or she) posts hateful diatribes about the other parent.

More importantly, the use of Spyware (online monitoring software) is becoming more prominent, so that suspicious spouses can even track the sites that a user visits. Additionally, more GPS devices are being used to monitor a car's movements. Suffice it to say, with technology becoming more affordable, the chances of tracking devices and programs being used in divorces will increase.

An experienced family law attorney can advise you on how to protect yourself from cyber attacks and monitoring.

Source: Chron.com, McCann investigations releases new case study titled Cyberstalking and Spyware in Divorce Cases, January 15, 2013

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